Global Privacy Control — Take Control Of Your Privacy

Disconnect logoExercising our privacy rights under the CCPA should be easy. The GPC signal has the potential to empower people to automatically opt out of the sale of their data globally, rather than manually researching complicated opt out processes and sending requests to one site or service at a time.

DuckDuckGo logoGetting privacy online should be simple and accessible to everyone, period. Global Privacy Control (GPC) takes us one step closer to making this vision a reality by creating a simple universal setting for users to express their preference for privacy. DuckDuckGo is proud to be a founding member of this effort and starting today, the GPC will be launching in our mobile browser and desktop browser extensions, making the setting available to over ten million consumers.

EFF logoEFF is excited to deploy GPC as part of Privacy Badger. It is critical for people to have easy-to-use and easy-to-understand technical tools to exercise their privacy rights. GPC is both, and can work alongside existing privacy-protective tools.

Glitch logoGlitch is all about making things easy for developers; we can’t wait to make it easy for devs to build apps that lead the way in respecting user privacy. Consumers have the right to limit how their data is accessed and used. Developers and technologists should design experiences so that exercising those rights is easy and universal. The GPC is hopefully the first of many steps we’ll take as an industry to promote greater privacy on the web.

Mozilla logoMozilla is pleased to support the Global Privacy Control initiative. People’s data rights must be recognized and respected, and this is a step in the right direction. We look forward to working with the rest of the web standards community to bring these protections to everyone.

References

  1. ^ California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) (oag.ca.gov)
  2. ^ General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) (eur-lex.europa.eu)
  3. ^ recent testimony before the US Senate (www.commerce.senate.gov)
  4. ^ Xavier Becerra (twitter.com)
  5. ^ Ashkan Soltani (twitter.com)
  6. ^ Georgetown Law (www.georgetowntech.org)
  7. ^ Sebastian Zimmeck (twitter.com)
  8. ^ Wesleyan University (www.wesleyan.edu)
  9. ^ The New York Times (www.nytimes.com)
  10. ^ The Washington Post (www.washingtonpost.com)
  11. ^ Financial Times (www.ft.com)
  12. ^ Automattic (WordPress.com & Tumblr) (automattic.com)
  13. ^ Glitch (glitch.com)
  14. ^ DuckDuckGo (spreadprivacy.com)
  15. ^ Brave (brave.com)
  16. ^ Mozilla (www.mozilla.org)
  17. ^ Disconnect (disconnect.me)
  18. ^ Abine (www.abine.com)
  19. ^ Digital Content Next (DCN) (digitalcontentnext.org)
  20. ^ Consumer Reports (advocacy.consumerreports.org)
  21. ^ Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) (www.eff.org)
  22. ^ Abine (www.abine.com)
  23. ^ Brave (brave.com)
  24. ^ Disconnect (disconnect.me)
  25. ^ DuckDuckGo (spreadprivacy.com)
  26. ^ EFF (www.eff.org)
  27. ^ Rob Shavell (twitter.com)
  28. ^ Abine (www.abine.com)
  29. ^ Brendan Eich (twitter.com)
  30. ^ Brave (brave.com)
  31. ^ Justin Brookman (twitter.com)
  32. ^ Consumer Reports (www.consumerreports.org)
  33. ^ Jason Kint (twitter.com)
  34. ^ Digital Content Next (digitalcontentnext.org)
  35. ^ Casey Oppenheim (twitter.com)
  36. ^ Disconnect (disconnect.me)
  37. ^ Gabriel Weinberg (twitter.com)
  38. ^ DuckDuckGo (duckduckgo.com)
  39. ^ Lee Tien (twitter.com)
  40. ^ EFF (www.eff.org)
  41. ^ Anil Dash (twitter.com)
  42. ^ Glitch (glitch.com)
  43. ^ Selena Deckelmann (twitter.com)
  44. ^ Firefox Desktop (www.mozilla.org)
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